Posts Tagged ‘authenticity’

Choking on one’s own sanctimony (I think Juana has ‘issues’ with me)

On harsh criticism “[A]t its worst, the show chokes on its own sanctimony,” Thus wrote a New York Times TV critic, Allesandra Stanley, responding (negatively) to The Newsroom, Aaron Sorkin’s latest TV series. The opening line of her review, ‘So Sayeth the Anchorman‘ reads: It’s not enough to be right; everyone else must be wrong. That’s […]

Laughing all the way to the Banks

‘Insufficient evidence’ From one Banksy to another — Police have decided they won’t prosecute ACT Party leader and sole MP John Banks for [alleged] electoral law offences relating to him improperly declaring tens of thousands of dollars of campaign donations as ‘anonymous’ when he’d personally solicited those very donations … because they can’t prove he […]

Someone who asks questions for a living does a good job of answering some

From one of the most thoughtful and illuminating* ‘Twelve Questions’ columns I’ve read … NZ Herald: Knowing what you know now about the media, would you still want to be a journalist if you were starting out in 2012? Anita McNaught: It has changed, but with a few reservations I love the way it has […]

Declaring where you’re coming from

Like most people (I think), I find it interesting, at times fascinating, to speculate about WHY people do and say what they do … WHY they might express views that they hold in the way they do … and WHY they enter into discussions or debates (and sometimes flame wars) on the internet. But I’ve […]

The curse of hypervigilance

Recent angst-ridden discussion about comments published on the internet have reminded me of a conclusion I reached when I was myself the subject of scurrilous anonymous comment: It can bloody hurt.  But some of the pain is, sadly, self-inflicted. We’ve seen again and again how anonymity seems to loosen people’s grip on civility. Some of […]

Best short article on blogging I’ve read

There is so much tripe written about blogging, and blogging versus journalism, and blogging as ‘weaponised’ internet, and blogging as barbarians at the gate of ‘big media’ and distorted propaganda or embarrassing ‘over-sharing’ disclosures … blah blah blah. If you care, read Jim Dalrymple’s post Blogging is not a thing, it’s an attitude. Yeah. The word ‘authenticity‘ […]

“Well, he would, wouldn’t he?”

Similarities While giving evidence at the trial of Stephen Ward, charged with living off the immoral earnings of Keeler and Rice-Davies, the latter made a famous riposte. When the prosecuting counsel pointed out that Lord Astor denied an affair or having even met her, former model and showgirl Mandy Rice-Davies (right) replied, “Well, he would, […]

Negative credibility sux, eh @whaleoil? eh @dpfdpf?

We’ve discussed before Dan Gilmor’s concept of ‘Negative Credibility‘ — the idea that sometimes information can have an appearance of LESS VERACITY because of its source. Gilmor pointed to Andrew Breitbart’s exposé of the Weiner/underpants/twitter ‘scandal’ (triggered by Rep. Weiner accidentally tweeting a photo as a public reply when he meant to send a DM, […]

Line in the sand, flip-flop, litmus test, lightning rod? Same sex marriage.

I don’t know if President Obama’s announcement today that he personally supports the right of same sex couples to marry will help or hurt him electorally, but from my point of view, it is absolutely the right call. And I’m not gay. Glenn Greenwald, who is, credits Obama’s actions, regardless of their motivation. I agree. […]

ACT: ‘Zero backing. Zilch, nil, nothing at all.’

John Armstrong attended the ACT Party conference over the weekend, with “80 or so party members present” … introducing his wrap up piece in the NZ Herald this morning like this: Act kicked off its annual conference on Saturday having just been kicked in the teeth. Delegates woke up to the news that the previous […]

An obituary for Facts

Read and enjoy: Rex Huppke’s Facts, 360 B.C. – A.D. 2012 – an obituary. To the shock of most sentient beings, Facts died Wednesday, April 18, after a long battle for relevancy with the 24-hour news cycle, blogs and the Internet. Though few expected Facts to pull out of its years-long downward spiral, the official […]

Bank sugar coats price-fixing penalty as ‘rebate’

‘Spin’ (bending reality), is not a phenomenon just confined to politics. At the risk of being accused of ‘looking a gift horse in the mouth’, here’s a fine example: Yesterday I saw this letter which looks like a kind gesture from the BNZ — telling ‘small business owners’ who are credit card merchants about the […]

What you see depends on where you stand

Some respectful discussion today here about open-mindedness and degrees of perception. And so, this — flicked into my tweetstream this afternoon — seems appropriate …

On narrow social focus and moral taste buds

A wonderful book review in the NY Times ‘Why Won’t They Listen?’ sheds some light on the ‘my tribe is better than yours’ bias we discuss here from time to time. Reviewing The Righteous Mind by Jonathan Haidt, William Saletan describes how we acquire preferences for social values (liberal v conservative) over time, based on […]

A dark, cynical, political thrill

I saw this film ‘The Ides of March’ with a pal on Friday night and it was brilliant. Dark, sinister, awful, and brilliant. What is it about politics that provokes acts of treachery and intrigue? Why does it so often descend into the arena of personal destruction? Plutarch records the intrigue surrounding Brutus’ assassination of […]